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DIRECTOR OF PLANNING AGENCY TO RETIRE AFTER 25-YEAR CAREER
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DIRECTOR OF PLANNING AGENCY TO RETIRE AFTER 25-YEAR CAREER

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When he was getting out of the Navy, Lindsay Cox was offered a job interview to become a weatherman with a Norfolk television station.

He turned it down, opting to enroll at N.C. State to become a landscape architect.The job Cox might have had went to a brash young man by the name of Willard Scott, who became a national celebrity as weatherman for NBC's ``Today' show.

``I have no regrets,' Cox said Monday as he looked back on a decision that would bring him to Guilford County and a 25-year career as executive director of the Piedmont Triad Council of Governments.

Cox, 62, will retire Jan. 15 from the council, a planning and advisory agency for seven Northern Piedmont counties and their municipalities.

He said he doesn't plan to set up business but may do some private landscaping work and office space planning.

After graduating from N.C. State, Cox went into landscaping in Greensboro and became director of the county planning department. He added the duties of council director when the council was formed in 1968.

When the council opened an office in Greensboro the next year, he became full-time executive director. The council's region was expanded to 11 counties the next year, but was split in 1979, with Alamance, Davidson, Caswell, Guilford, Randolph and Rockingham remaining in the original region. Forsyth and counties to its west and north were put into a new region.

In recent months, the executive committees of the two councils have met and agreed to coordinate their programs.

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