Skip to main content
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
HEART FAILED MAN WHO FEARED CURSE

HEART FAILED MAN WHO FEARED CURSE

  • Updated
  • 0

A former Raleigh radio broadcaster found dead in his bathtub in Seattle in April died of heart failure, according to Washington authorities.

The death of Christopher Case, 35, had drawn wide interest because he had expressed fear of a witch's curse. The cause of death was acute myocarditis, said Tony Burtt, spokesman for the King County police in Seattle.Officers found his clothed body in the waterless tub April 18 after they were asked to check on him by a woman friend in Fayetteville, Burtt said.

The woman, whose name was not disclosed, said Case told her in phone calls that he was afraid a witch in San Francisco had put a curse on him, Burtt said.

``There was no sign of a crime, no sign of violence, robbery or foul play,' said Rich Garner, a medical investigator with the King County Medical Examiner's Office.

About 10 spent candles and crucifixes were found in Case's apartment, Burtt said. Lines of salt had been poured along the base of the apartment walls.

Another Fayetteville woman, Sammye Souder, a psychic and teacher who was a friend of Case, said he also told his fears to her.

Be the first to know

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

  • Updated

Guilford County Schools will delay the return of grades 3-8, Superintendent Sharon Contreras said Wednesday, in light of the data she's reviewed about COVID-19 statistics locally. 

She is also delaying the return of some vulnerable populations of high school students that they had expected to bring back earlier than other high school students, and students in the four schools that serve students with special needs. 

  • Updated

Guilford County Schools will delay the return of grades 3-8, Superintendent Sharon Contreras said Wednesday, in light of the data she's reviewed about COVID-19 statistics locally. 

She is also delaying the return of some vulnerable populations of high school students that they had expected to bring back earlier than other high school students, and students in the four schools that serve students with special needs. 

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

Breaking News