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Sunday's letters

Sunday's letters

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No comparison

Each of the letters I've seen regarding marital infidelity on the part of Cal Cunningham have one thing in common: Trump did it, too.

While I'll never condone marital infidelity, there is a difference in this case, which renders the comparisons meaningless.

When Trump announced his candidacy in 2016, everyone knew that he had a long history of marital infidelity. There was no secret and it appears his days of marital infidelity are over.

Cal Cunningham has based his entire campaign on his status as a veteran and particularly as a devoted family man, yet he was having an affair. If he broke public and family trust with a secret affair, which is directly contrary to the candidate he presented himself to be, how can we trust him on other issues?

My wise mother taught me not to attempt to justify the misdeeds of one person, often myself, by similar misdeeds of another. She always said, "Two wrongs don't make a right."

Tom Imbus

Browns Summit

Are we too free?

I'm a 75-plus-year-old grandfather, a veteran of the Vietnam era, I have voted in every election since I was 18 and until this year, I have considered myself reasonably patriotic.

The insight of traveling outside the country (before our present situation) has caused me some concern about our political path. This year however, I have seen that we are maybe too free. We have the freedom to carry firearms to schools, churches, bars and clubs and shoot people with whom we disagree. We have the right to infect others with a potentially lethal disease because we are macho enough not to wear a mask. We expect no consequences for rude and hurtful behavior. Our political activities have become a blood sport.

Will we ever return to civility? Or was I just too disenchanted to think we ever were civil? Canada is looking more and more inviting and who knows, with global warming, Toronto may be the new Charlotte!

Paul Herger

High Point 

How? And why?

It is so interesting to see the lengths that people will go to rationalize their trust in the current president. We all have faults and it is not right to judge an individual by some single weakness.

Would you, however, allow your daughter or wife to spend the day with the president?

Would you have sent your children to Trump University? Would you be happy now if you had donated to the Trump family charity? Would you, right now, invest your life savings in a Trump business endeavor?

How did we get to the point where so many people place so much faith in a man that so obviously has such poor morals and ethics? How did we get to the point where science seems like a dirty word when we all benefit from it? How could creating clean energy and reinvigorating the health of our planet seem like an act against God, especially if it brought new jobs and helped us keep up with other countries?

These questions haunt me. I hope they haunt many of us because the path we seem to be on makes no clear sense.

Wayne Foster

Greensboro

Solomon’s wisdom

Our country should be very concerned and alarmed that we have a president who will not commit to accepting the results of the Nov. 3 election. Our democracy is sustained by the peaceful transfer of power. By not embracing our democratic norms, Donald Trump continues to harm, threaten and divide our country.

In contrast, candidate Joe Biden has strongly confirmed his willingness to abide by the will of the people and accept the results of the election. Which candidate deserves our support and trust?

Let us consult 1 Kings 3:16-28 for guidance. This famous biblical story tells of two women who claim a child. Solomon ruled in favor of the woman who would give up the child in order to save its life and against the woman who would allow the child to be killed if she couldn’t have it for her own.

With the child as a metaphor for our country, we should rule in favor of Joe Biden, who wants to unite our country and protect and preserve our democratic norms. We should remove Donald Trump, who divides us and threatens chaos and national turmoil if he loses the election.

Paul Stewart

Greensboro

Surviving adversity

Who is ready for positivity and proactivity? I am.

As hard as we have all been hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, nature is doing what nature does — testing, challenging and forcing adaptation.

Generations before us know this well. Beating adversity and coming out stronger on the other side is the key to success. And, all of this hardship happening during an election year is beyond unfortunate. What should be a 9/11 moment in time when Americans unite has become a partisan divide devoid of consistent interpretations of the scientific process to recognize, understand and mitigate a novel threat to our species.

Science and politics are oil and water. Combining the two is a dangerous biological direction.

Our team at the Greensboro Science Center is 100% united in surviving the challenges and impacts of COVID-19. Our COVID-survival mission is threefold: care for our animals, care for our guests and care for our community. Our animals have received impeccable, uninterrupted care. Our guests have been assured of our “Safety In Focus” operational protocols.

And our community will soon come together in the spirit of the holidays at Winter Wonder Lights, a spectacular inaugural event focused on light, love and saying farewell to 2020.

Glenn Dobrogosz

Greensboro

The writer is CEO of the Greensboro Science Center.

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