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Wednesday's letters
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Wednesday's letters

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A bold stance

Regarding the editorial “For the patients’ sake, let them go,” Sept. 29:

Thank goodness somebody still has guts.

I am a 61-year-old who has been a bedside registered nurse for almost 38 years and I live in Guilford County. Having spent almost 19 years working in a psychiatric hospital most recently, I have great empathy for people affected by mental health issues. I have seen up close and personal how the effects of drug abuse, medication noncompliance and judgment from families negatively affect individuals with mental health struggles.

Your editorial was spot-on, meaning not only do I believe unvaccinated caregivers do not belong in our health care systems, I, for one, am not sure I would trust these individuals to care for my family.

Thank you so much for having the courage to take a stand on what I feel is a very moral issue — as well as a social responsibility of us all.

Patricia Duke

Greensboro

It’s their choice; let’s respect it

A big thank-you to the Steven Tanger Center for the Performing Arts in Greensboro for not requiring COVID-19 vaccination or a negative test result for patrons to attend every performance. I have been vaccinated; however, I do not believe the citizens who decide not to be vaccinated should be discriminated against.

Everyone has a choice to be vaccinated or not, just as everyone has the choice to attend performances or not. I and many others will have no hesitation sitting next to an unvaccinated individual, so the idea that this policy will harm attendance is unfounded.

In fact, when COVID-19 is a distant memory, I will remember businesses that required vaccinations to enter and I will not reward them with my future attendance.

I, like many others, will reward the business owners who did not try to further divide our citizens with unnecessary restrictions.

Benny Pittman

Oak Ridge

A vocal minority

Joe Biden was the winner, but the 2020 election results continue to be questioned by a disinformation industry making money from a cult of uneducated deniers. This war against truth now includes local, state and national efforts to limit voting rights, dispute the science that supports COVID vaccinations and sabotage the Biden agenda.

However, polling shows the majority of Americans support making voting easier, vaccinations to defeat COVID and government investment to build back better, all efforts to improve our quality of life. But they’re being attacked by an active, loud, misinformed and vocal minority. Since the transition of power, many voters, who were fatigued after finally overturning years of incompetent leadership, turned their attention away from political issues. But they prematurely concluded the last election results will put our country on a secure recovery course. Wrong!

The election was only one more battle in a war that continues, so please recommit to helping elected officials pass current legislation while preparing for a major fight in 2022. To the silent majority: Get involved, if only by writing letters and speaking out in your church, workplace and at family gatherings.

Working together we will defeat this dangerous vocal minority.

Bruce Bower

Greensboro

Last chance?

Moderates want the $1 trillion bill for bridges and highways, and a human infrastructure bill of much less than $3.5 trillion, to be passed by Congress. Progressives want that $3.5 trillion reconciliation bill that covers child care, health care and climate change measures to be passed, along with the $1 trillion hard infrastructure bill.

Contrary to wild-eyed criticism, both bills could be approved at moderate cost over the 10-year plan by increasing income taxes on those making more than $400,000 and increasing corporate taxes and closing tax loopholes. Most Americans favor the bills and that funding plan.

But sometimes politics raises its ugly head. Maybe a Democrat or two (and every Republican) sees a yes vote as political suicide. Maybe they think that the bills are good for the country, but that their constituents would vote them out of office.

This is an opportunity to get our country moving on better highways and railways. To get families back to work because they can now afford child care. To get children a head start on education. To stem the hazards of climate change.

And it may be American democracy’s last chance to prove itself capable of doing big things.

Gary Parker

Archdale

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