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PLANNED FOR KINSTON / CARGO PARK IS CALLED WAVE OF THE FUTURE
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PLANNED FOR KINSTON / CARGO PARK IS CALLED WAVE OF THE FUTURE

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A global transpark planned for Kinston in eastern North Carolina is the transportation wave of the future and will help industries up and down the East Coast remain competitive internationally, the complex's godfather said Thursday.

Jack Kasarda, the UNC-Chapel Hill professor whose idea for a transpark was adopted by the state, said seaports, rivers and canals, railroads and then cars and trucks in turn have dominated transportation systems and spurred economic growth in the United States.The transpark, with its thousands of acres for industrial development and 13,000-foot runways for giant planes flying to and from all parts of the world, represents the next major step forward in transportation technology, Kasarda said in a lecture at UNCG.

It will combine high-speed jets with advanced communication systems, globalization of business and just-in-time manufacturing, he said. With North Carolina's central location, it will serve businesses in the eastern half of the United States by allowing them to ship custom-made products swiftly and often throughout the world, he said.

Kasarda also praised the Piedmont Triad Airport Authority for pursuing additional air cargo business at the Triad airport.

He said that there will be tremendous growth in the shipment of goods by air and that the authority is wise to pursue cargo business rather than compete with Charlotte and Raleigh/Durham airports for passengers.

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