Skip to main content
Updating results

Stem

  • Updated

Cutworms only take a few bites out of new transplants, which doesn’t seem like it would do much harm, except that those bites are at ground level. Attacked seedlings topple over, dead. Don’t confuse this damage with damping-off disease, which is caused by a fungus that also attacks at the soil line, but usually affects only very young, newly sprouted seedlings.

  • Updated

No need to prune and repot every houseplant every year. Many grow very slowly, so might need this treatment only every few years.

  • Updated

Pruning the stems of a houseplant is just the first step. After a few years, depending on how fast a plant grows, roots will fill a pot until they have no room left to grow. Roots attempting to escape out the drainage hole of a pot is one indication of overcrowding.

  • Updated

The most obvious reason to prune a houseplant's stems is to keep the plant manageable. For example, growing in the ground in a tropical climate, branches of weeping fig, a familiar houseplant, will reach skyward and spread as high and wide as a sugar maple's. Indoors, at the very least, your ceilings limit the desired height of a houseplant. For looks, you might want to keep the plant smaller, perhaps much, much smaller.

  • Updated

A big way to make a statement is with plants, and according to Mickey Hargitay of Mickey Hargitay Plants, the weirder the better.

  • Updated
  • 5 min to read

Alphina Kamara wonders what might have happened if she'd been introduced to science and engineering careers in high school.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

Breaking News